Science Majors’ Wedding

February 5th, 2018

I worked on the loveliest little wedding last summer.  The two people who got married are in science, with a lot of friends who are also in that field.  They are both also handicrafters.  The bride knitted the gorgeous lace shawl that she wore on her wedding day, and the groom crocheted all the flower decorations–including the bride’s bouquet!  I’ve never seen anything like it.  Take a close look at these beautiful photos from Allison Williams Photography for all the ways that science and hand crafts had a part in their very special day.

The ceremony was at Berger Park in Edgwater.  The reception was at Bistro Campagne in Lincoln Square.  Guitar music was provided by John Behling.  Truffles came from Katherine Anne Confections.  And the trolley was from 2nd City Trolley.

bride and parents groom and parents lakeside ceremony ceremony guitaristbride's shawlreception signsplace cardscrocheted centerpiecesmall receptionsweetheart tabletest tube centerpiecebride on trolleybride and groom toastsmall restaurant receptionscience project guest bookguest book graphtruffle towerbeaker with caramelscrocheted boutonnierecrocheted bouquet

Vendors I Know: Ryan Timm Photography

April 3rd, 2017
Photo by Ryan Timm Photography.

Photo by Ryan Timm Photography.

Sometimes I run across a vendor that I never knew about and whose work I like a lot.  Photographer Ryan Timm is in that category.  I worked with him on a wedding last fall and was completely stunned by the photos he shared with me.  I’m pretty jaded about event photography, too, so it’s hard to get my attention.  But Ryan managed it with beautiful photos, each one a little narrative in itself.

I was also impressed that he caught so many wonderful photos working entirely by himself.  Most wedding photographers work in teams, so I was very surprised that he did all the work himself.  I was doubly impressed that working solo did not compromise the quality of his photos at all.

There are a lot of excellent wedding photographers in the Chicago area.  There are plenty that I’d be more than happy to recommend.  I’m glad to expand the list by one more, now that I know Ryan.

Re-run: DIY Weddings–Photography

March 27th, 2017

Today’s DIY topic is:  Photography.  I’ve updated the original post a little here.

You might look at the cost of professional photography (which can run from $1,500 on the very low end to over $6,000 on the high end) and you might think you’d be better off without a professional photographer.  You might be right.  Or you might be very disappointed.  It all depends on how important photos are to you.

Here's a photo I took with my point-and-shoot camera and limited photography skills.

Here’s a photo I took with my point-and-shoot camera and limited photography skills.

If having high quality photos of your entire wedding and reception is not your first priority, you can ask a friend or relative to document the day for you.  Someone with good photography equipment can probably take decent photos for you.

But if having professional quality photos is important, it’s difficult to get them without paying professional prices.  Professional wedding photographers have equipment and skills that ordinary mortals lack.  The best consistently take copious, excellent photos that capture the essence of your day.  They are on the spot and work hard so they don’t miss any important moments.  It’s also important that they are not guests, but are hired to work for the entire time, so they will be alert and sober until the time they leave.  They know what to look for and how to take good (and often stunning) photos of your wedding.

The same cake in a photo taken by Agnes Malorny, professional.

The same cake in a photo taken by Agnes Malorny, professional.

If you have a friend or relative take photos, they may or may not have the same equipment.  Unless they are professionals or truly talented amateurs, they probably don’t have the same skills.  And you won’t know until the wedding day if they will be paying attention (and sober) for the whole evening.  At some point, a friend or relative is going to stop working and start enjoying the party, which is an option a paid professional doesn’t have.

As with all DIY projects, think this one through before you make a decision.  There is a definite difference in quality between amateur and professional photos.  Decide what is important to you, and then pay a professional if you can’t live without those photos.

Re-run: DIY Weddings–Photography

August 25th, 2014

Today’s DIY topic is:  Photography.  I’ve updated the original post a little here.

You might look at the cost of professional photography and think you’d be better off without a professional photographer.  You might be right.  Or you might be very disappointed.  It all depends on how important photos are to you.

Here's a photo I took with my point-and-shoot camera and limited photography skills.

Here's a photo I took with my point-and-shoot camera and limited photography skills.

If having high quality photos of your entire wedding and reception is not your first priority, you can ask a friend or relative to document the day for you.  Someone with good photography equipment can probably take decent photos for you.

But if having professional quality photos is important, it’s difficult to get them without paying professional prices.  Professional wedding photographers have equipment and skills that ordinary mortals lack.  The best consistently take copious, excellent photos that capture the essence of your day.  They are on the spot and work hard so they don’t miss any important moments.  It’s also important that they are not guests, but are hired to work for the entire time, so they will be alert and sober until the time they leave.  They know what to look for and how to take good (and often stunning) photos of your wedding.

The same cake in a photo taken by Agnes Malorny, professional.

The same cake in a photo taken by Agnes Malorny, professional.

If you have a friend or relative take photos, they may or may not have the same equipment.  Unless they are professionals or truly talented amateurs, they probably don’t have the same skills.  And you won’t know until the wedding day if they will be paying attention (and sober) for the whole evening.  At some point, a friend or relative is going to stop working and start enjoying the party, which is an option a paid professional doesn’t have.

As with all DIY projects, think this one through before you make a decision.  There is a definite difference in quality between amateur and professional photos.  Decide what is important to you, and then pay a professional if you can’t live without those photos.